In Place of Your Character

I know everyone has their own methods of how they write their characters. I have written in previous posts of how to make your character’s more real by adding personalities, flaws, and importance to write of the characters age level in regards to the readability of your own writing.

I want to take it a bit further with a suggestion that actually has helped me in the past. Physically surround yourself with the character’s situation. I don’t mean the situation as in trying to mirror the drama in your own life or actually go sword fight on a ship somewhere. However, I do mean to physically get out of your writing area and to explore the world.

Examples:

  • If your novel is a period dated story, then some evening, turn off your lights and write by hand in candlelight. Describe what your thoughts and feelings are with what you are experiencing. Does it make the area seem more relaxed, does it enhance other senses, etc. Consider making a small list to try and focus on what you want your character to think or feel before you do the exercise.
  • Also, go explore antique shops and ask the owners if they have any pieces for the specific era your novel occurs. Go to a library and talk to the librarians or county records buildings with the genealogy. The majority of the time, those places will be able to give you contact information of local historians. Those historians not only know the local history, but since they love history so much, they are almost a walking encyclopedia who has studied other eras.
  • If your character is in school, again go to a library. Try to remember what it was like in your own school library while you’re there. You may even run into teachers or retire teachers. Go to a few of the local high school sports games and write what it feels like to be there.
  • If it is a murder mystery, serious contact your local police. See if you can do a tour or talk to a retired or active police officer. Depending on the community and restrictions, they even may let you do a ride along.
  • If your story is a western, go to the farmer’s market. There will be a farmer there who always knows someone they can direct you to that can answer your questions. Or the local feed mills are always the hot place to get information.

There was a story I wrote years ago that I wanted a more real life take from, so I took up archery. Trust me, I can tell you in detail how horrible a bruise someone will get if the string snaps back wrong. I can now proudly say that I have hit bull’s-eye several times.

Any of these examples and more should be considered. HOWEVER, you MUST take notes. You may remember the experience for several weeks down the road, but you will start forgetting the smaller things such as answers you may have received or even the meaning of certain lingo of the industry.

My motto: keep writing, keep learning.

L.R. Mauck

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Author: lrmauck

Over the last decade, I have received several positive feedbacks on my stories and one college professor encouraging me to pursue a career as a writer. I have attended a few elective writing classes at IUS to help hone in on my skills. I have recently attended Kentucky Writing Workshop in Louisville, KY where I learned more hands-on experience and encouragement from other writers. I currently resides in southern Indiana with my four fur babies. Follow me on twitter at: @lrmauck

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