Extra Details

As a writer, it is very tempting to get as much as possible into a story so that the readers can see the same story and details that we see when writing it. Through editing, the story gets refined and sometimes details are cut because they do not add anything additional to the actual story plot.

However, I would say to keep in a few of those extra little details. They may not add to the plot, but they add to the story.

The best example I can give is not a modern book: the Bible. I hardly know of any other books that has the same plot, situation, and people, but has different writers. In the book of Luke, the extra details given do not take away from Matthew, Mark, or John, but adds to it. In (NKJV) Luke chapter 6 verse 1: “Now it happened on the second Sabbath after the first that He went through the grainfields. And His disciples plucked the heads of grain and ate them, rubbing them in their hands.” Matthew (12:1-8) and Mark (2:23-28) mention the same situation, however, they do not included the “rubbing them in their hands.”

wheat

I’m a farmer’s daughter, so I mentally picture the grain as raw wheat. If you have seen raw wheat in the fields, then you would know that there is an outer skin protecting the grain seed. It is rough and there is hair-like fibers on it (see picture). If the disciples were walking by the field, plucking the grain heads and eating them, I automatically want to cringe. However, the extra detail Luke provides, says they were “rubbing them in their hands”. That extra detail turns my cringe into understanding. Rubbing the raw wheat heads in their hands would breaks apart the outer skin to separate the grain seeds.

With this example, you see small five words changed the description. I don’t mean that you as a writer need to lay out every single step-by-step action. That gets redundant and tedious. However, a few well placed details provides a more refine mental image to the reader.

An additional note: don’t be too descriptive in your writing.  You don’t have to describe the fluffy clouds or how blue the bluejay’s feathers are. Keep the story moving. Paint the picture, but don’t lose the picture image because of the brush strokes.

L. R. Mauck

 

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Author: lrmauck

Over the last decade, I have received several positive feedbacks on my stories and one college professor encouraging me to pursue a career as a writer. I have attended a few elective writing classes at IUS to help hone in on my skills. I have recently attended Kentucky Writing Workshop in Louisville, KY where I learned more hands-on experience and encouragement from other writers. I currently resides in southern Indiana with my four fur babies. Follow me on twitter at: @lrmauck

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